adjusted for prematurity

Yes, today is World Prematurity Day because one in nine babies every day are born much too soon. Check out #WorldPrematurityDay and you shall see hundreds and hundreds of images of babies who literally can fit into your hands wearing diapers no bigger than a saltine cracker and you shall see pictures of some of those same tiny babies as smiling school aged children or teenagers or even adults. My own social media timelines are flooded with images of some co-workers own preemies and friends and the parents of former patients as we recognize the tiniest but mightiest humans we have ever known not necessarily to celebrate but to remind everyone that in spite of amazing strides in Perinatal and Neonatal medicine and nursing care, prematurity still happens and when it happens the adjustments for prematurity happen.

age 1 month/28 weeks adjusted age; 792 grams/1lb 7oz

I remember having to explain way too many times the adjusted age of Daniel during the first few years of his life. How that adjusted age seemed to annoy some as they would sarcastically question if we were going to be using his adjusted age when he was a grown man.

Perhaps.

Maybe.

What do you care?

As he has grown and developed, knowing Daniel’s adjusted age helped so much in understanding this life living on preemie time. It helped to have just a little more patience when he didn’t walk until age 30 months (26 months adjusted age) or when we struggled so mightily with potty training and eating. But the fact of the matter is that after the magical age of 2 or 3, adjusting does not abruptly end. Experience has taught me that these tiny humans carry so much more than the physical scars of needle pokes, TCM burns, healed incisions and chest tube scars. The bright lights, the loud, clanging alarms, the noxious smells, even certain touches remind them of the trauma they survived that was intended to help them survive. PTSD is readily accepted in adults after hospitalization, why would it not be valid for a tiny infant whose brain isn’t even fully developed and spends weeks, months even in an intensive care setting? Just because they can’t articulate it does not mean that it is not real.

The fact of the matter is for this child, this boy, there is always adjustments for his extreme premature birth. Adjustments in how he learns, how he expresses himself, how he eats, how he grows, how he handles noxious stimuli, how he reacts in stressful situations. Adjustments because he is who he is. We have come to learn and understand so much of who this boy is and what he is passionate about just by adjusting. He’ll never stop being an individual who was born 4 months too soon. He will always be that. Today, and every day, we honor that, we celebrate it, we accept it and, yes, we adjust.

I feared because it was too early, I cried because it was too soon. Yet I underestimated the strength in one as small as you. ~ Unknown

 

 

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