catching up, investing in female research solving the world’s greatest challenges and (maybe) doing my taxes

It’s been awhile since I posted, hasn’t it? I have a pretty good reason/distraction/excuse as I’m sure most of you all know. Follow me or lurk anywhere else where I am online I know that you know. Or you could just ask me…or call…or text…or “Facebook” me…or tweet at me. Updates are out there for sure. So while the family circus catches up on sleep and adjusts to a new normal life under The Big Top, we find we must catch up on a lot of other things like bills, my getting back to work (to pay those bills since Bill will be out for the foreseeable future), teacher conferences and report cards, changing Spring Break plans (because Bill is not able to work for the weeks to come), getting taxes done for kids’ FAFSAs, birthdays…

OH CRAP! I forgot my baby sister’s birthday! I swear family health crises that distract me always seem to happen when important things are happening in her life. Clearly I suck as a sister. Excuse me while I send her a card and an apology…

And then I remember something I recently promised to do for another sister…the sister who is taller than me and definitely smarter than me and asked me to be the oldest first-time bridesmaid ever. Oh, who am I kidding, they all are smarter than me! But back to Ange…

Remember when mountain lions came to Modesto and Turlock? There was much talk of the serious drought and suburban sprawl of our growing Central Valley communities increasing the likelihood of seeing these carnivores. It’s a real thing.

And my sister is devoting her doctoral studies on just that: Carnivore conservation in an era of rapid development.

The Southwestern U.S. has the most diverse assemblage of carnivores anywhere in the U.S., ranging from mountain lions and black bears to kit foxes and spotted skunks. It also has the fastest growing population in the U.S. The population of Arizona grew nearly 584% between 1950 and 2000. As the population of southern Arizona grows, annual visitation rates to its protected areas also grow, resulting in greater impacts on the areas’ wildlife. To adequately manage and conserve carnivore species within protected areas, information on how they may respond to different levels of human disturbance is essential.

Your donations will fund a project that will not only help her in completing her PhD, but also help collect valuable information on the impacts of human disturbance on carnivore communities.

If you can, please helping fund this project. Donate what you can, if you can. But donate soon because she now has less than 13 days left in her fundraising effort.

Thanks!

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